BRINGING IN THE BEANS

IN A FIELD along Missouri Highway 10, near Hardin, Kirk Ellis, 70, is on his 9870 John Deere combine in the early stages of bringing in his soybean crop last week. He says he might have planted more, but about a third of his farm got hit by flooding that prevented getting crops in the field.

HARDIN – A combine churns just west of Hardin, bringing a second field of soybeans, Kirk Ellis, 70, says after stepping down from his 9870 John Deere rig.

Ellis brought in 40 acres earlier and had gotten started on 130 – just a small part of what he owns.

Prices are an uncertainty, he says.

“If they get the trade issue settled, maybe they’ll get better,” Ellis says. “They could be worse, if we had another big crop like we had last year.”

A big crop could add to a national glut of beans that would drive down prices. Farmers already are concerned that bean prices are off because the Chinese are buying less beans due to the trade war with the United States.

“Over the country, the crop is smaller, which should help,” Ellis says.

His crop is smaller, too.

“We didn’t plant 800 acres,” Ellis says.

READ MORE ABOUT THE SOYBEAN CROP IN FRIDAY'S RICHMOND NEWS

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