Socialize

Facebook

Pig-Pig’s days inside the city limits numbered

Ordinance in Orrick restricts most residents from owning farm animals inside the city

Pig-Pig, a miniature pot-bellied pig, was the subject of discussion Monday at Orrick Board of Aldermen. A resident of Kirkum Street said the animal squealed and left an aroma that prevented him from opening a bedroom window.  (Photo by David Knopf/Richmond News)

Pig-Pig, a miniature pot-bellied pig, was the subject of discussion Monday at Orrick Board of Aldermen. A resident of Kirkum Street said the animal squealed and left an aroma that prevented him from opening a bedroom window. (Photo by David Knopf/Richmond News)

By David Knopf/News Editor

Miss Piggy might think Pig-Pig’s kinda cute, but Orrick Aldermen want him to take his good looks elsewhere.

Like outside the city limits. The all-black, miniature pot-bellied pig will have 10 days to show pigs can fly or tickets and a court date await.

Pig-Pig currently lives in a pen outside a home. When it was cold, he lived inside the cute-as-a-button house on Kirkham Street, but a boyfriend didn’t want a pig as a roommate. So the pig’s owner reluctantly let him put new roots in the outdoor pen.

That’s when the problems started.

An area resident came to Monday’s board of aldermen meeting to tell his story.

“The neighbor has a pig,” he said. “It was inside, but once it got warmer they moved it outside. It’s just the smell and the squealin’. It sounds like the pig’s getting called all the time.”

The resident didn’t want to raise a stink – or squeal on an upstanding neighbor – but figuratively speaking at least, he does wish someone would steal the bacon. So he’s asked the authorities to intervene.

The neighbor told board members that, pigs being pigs, the aroma has wafted at times in the general direction of his bedroom window.

“I keep the window closed and won’t be able to run the AC once it gets warm,” he said.

He said Pig-Pig had escaped its pen on occasion, then rooted and relieved itself in shrubs around his house.

Orrick Police Chief Ray Dinwiddie told board members that the city does have an ordinance that forbids  keeping farm animals within the city limits. The exception is if said pig, cow, goat or mule is lucky enough to live on property far enough removed from any neighboring house.

“There are a couple of houses in Orrick that can have pigs (or other farm animals), but they have to be 500 feet from the next house,” Dinwiddie said, ordinance book in hand.

The neighbor with the currently closed bedroom window isn’t so lucky.

The complete story is in the Thursday, May 14, 2015 Richmond News.

Click here for our E-edition and read the rest of the story.

You must be logged in to post a comment Login