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Festival exhibitors come at Missouri’s role in the Civil War from different directions

By Sara Seidel, Richmond News Correspondent

Side by side booths at Outlaw Days featured devotees of Civil War history, and they presented information not always included in traditional textbooks covering American history.
The John T. Hughes Camp of the Sons of Confederate Veterans manned one of the booths. Descendants of Confederate veterans were on hand to ensure that those veterans are remembered, according toSara Civil War Pic 2-c Tim Borron of Buckner.
“(The group) exists to honor the good name of our ancestors,” Borron said. “We want to make sure that what they did for their cause is not forgotten.”
With about 70 members, the group is named for John T. Hughes, a colonel in the Missouri State Guard and the Confederate Army. The camp operates out of Independence, and members have conducted research to trace their lineage to Confederate soldiers.
When members participate in events like Outlaw Days, they meet a lot of friendly folks, Borron said. He added, however, that a lot of ignorance about the true history of the war exists among those folks.
He said, for example, that some 85,000 men of color fought under Confederate flags, as noted in the book Black Confederates.
“We like to help educate people,” Borron said. “We promote Confederate history and heritage.”
Members of the camp plan to attend The Battle of Albany events in October, he said.

Book sellers John Moloski and Cathy Gottsch, above, of Burnt District Press say they like to promote Civil War history through the books in their catalog. Sons of Confederate Veterans exhibitor Tim Borron, right, of Buckner said his organization’s role is preserve the memory of Confederate soldiers. (Photos by Sara Seidel/Richmond News)

Book sellers John Moloski and Cathy Gottsch, above, of Burnt District Press say they like to promote Civil War history through the books in their catalog. Sons of Confederate Veterans exhibitor Tim Borron, right, of Buckner said his organization’s role is preserve the memory of Confederate soldiers. (Photos by Sara Seidel/Richmond News)

John Moloski, meanwhile, offered up a variety of books about events that occurred in the Trans-Mississippi Theater during the Civil War. The material available included state and local history, historical fiction and family histories. Moloski said his company’s books feature material based on events that are largely unknown.
“We’re promoting Missouri’s Civil War history,” he said. “We’re trying to tell the story” of the area.
The material was printed by Burnt District Press, a publishing company Moloski operates with Jackie Roberts in Harrisonville. The name refers to events in four western Missouri counties, which were first evacuated and then burned during the Civil War.

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