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Fake slithery thing helps protect Camdenite’s birds

It’s a dog-eat-dog world out there, or in this case a climbing predator-eat-baby-bird world, so Camden resident Richard Dunwoodie seems to have employed a rubber snake to scare off whatever animal might climb or fly up for a look-see. According to Melissa Mayntz, birding/wild birds expert for the Web site About Home (www.about.com), ‘Nesting season is hazardous for birds, and there are many predators that consider eggs, hatchlings and even brooding adult birds a tempting, tasty meal,’ Mayntz says. ‘By taking steps to protect bird houses from hungry predators, it is possible to help nesting birds raise their families in safety.’ She says the most common culprits targeting bird houses include snakes, raccoons, squirrels, mice, rats, oppossum, bears and chipmunks. Dunwoodie can cross bears off his list of predator concerns. (Photo by David Knopf/Richmond News)

It’s a dog-eat-dog world out there, or in this case a climbing predator-eat-baby-bird world, so Camden resident Richard Dunwoodie seems to have employed a rubber snake to scare off whatever animal might climb or fly up for a look-see. According to Melissa Mayntz, birding/wild birds expert for the Web site About Home (www.about.com), ‘Nesting season is hazardous for birds, and there are many predators that consider eggs, hatchlings and even brooding adult birds a tempting, tasty meal,’ Mayntz says. ‘By taking steps to protect bird houses from hungry predators, it is possible to help nesting birds raise their families in safety.’ She says the most common culprits targeting bird houses include snakes, raccoons, squirrels, mice, rats, oppossum, bears and chipmunks. Dunwoodie can cross bears off his list of predator concerns. (Photo by David Knopf/Richmond News)

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