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One-room Ogg School has lessons to spare

By Emogene Ogg

Seventy years have passed since I completed my first year of teaching at the Ogg School. Many things have changed in that span of time.

The Ogg School’s 2014 reunion was June 1. Pictured, above, first row: Judy Pettus Hunt, Donna Jean Robinson Duncan Standing: Florence Heath Williams, Emogene Snider Ogg, Darle Nespory, Nellie Heath Lugenbeel Not Pictured: Iris Robinson McCroskie, Don Pettus, Leva Fern Cain Penny.

The Ogg School’s 2014 reunion was June 1. Pictured, above, first row: Judy Pettus Hunt, Donna Jean Robinson Duncan
Standing: Florence Heath Williams, Emogene Snider Ogg, Darle Nespory, Nellie Heath Lugenbeel
Not Pictured: Iris Robinson McCroskie, Don Pettus, Leva Fern Cain Penny.

When I think of the one-room rural grade school, it seems almost impossible it could have happened in our lifetime.
Our school had no electricity, no running water, two outhouses and one teacher. I was paid about $60 a month and that included the

Photo, right, first row: Bessie Heath, Iris Robinson, Don Pettus, Carl Fales, Nellie Heath, Judy Pettus Back Row: Darle Nespory, Florence Heath, Doris Nespory, Donna Jean Robinson, Emogene Snider. (Submitted photos)

Photo, right, first row: Bessie Heath, Iris Robinson, Don Pettus, Carl Fales, Nellie Heath, Judy Pettus
Back Row: Darle Nespory, Florence Heath, Doris Nespory, Donna Jean Robinson, Emogene Snider.
(Submitted photos)

janitor work.
I doubt it cost over $2,000 a year to run the entire school. But everyone learned to read, write and do arithmetic.
The temperatures dropped well below zero in the winter and most of the children walked two or more miles to school, after arriving with frost-bitten ears, noses or cheeks.
I rode my dad’s horse, Nellie, to school.
The heat, what there was, came from a big old potbellied stove at the back of the room.  There was no school lunch program. We all brought a sack lunch from home.
The highlights of the year were the box suppers in the latter part of October, where we made enough money to buy a hand pump for the well, a used phonograph, the Christmas program, as well as treats and the basket dinner and programs on the last day of school.
I’ve kept in contact with these boys and girls through the years and each one has made me proud to have played a small part in their lives.
I have many fond memories and recollections of those by-gone days of the one-room school, from which we still could take a few lessons today.

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