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In 1920s, counties cooperated to fund new Missouri Bridge

It’s since been replaced by an even more modern bridge, but when the first steel-and-concrete span opened in 1925 to link Ray and Lafayette counties it was big news, so much so that groups often gathered near it for photos. Pictured here are Elizabeth Blair Long, far right, and Margaret Blair McGraw, the tallest of the four women. Names of the other two women are unknown. The two boys are Jim Blair, the taller one, and Joe Bob Long. The photo was taken from the Lexington side, near the memorial that was built on the Lafayette County side. According to a description in the new book ‘Lexington,’ from Arcadia Publishing’s ‘Images of America’ series, voters in both counties quickly passed bonds to raise the $450,000 each side contributed to build the bridge (See related story below). The bonds were passed in 1922, but the bridge didn’t open until Nov. 5, 1925. (Photo contributed by Jean McGraw Clark, Blue Springs)

It’s since been replaced by an even more modern bridge, but when the first steel-and-concrete span opened in 1925 to link Ray and Lafayette counties it was big news, so much so that groups often gathered near it for photos. Pictured here are Elizabeth Blair Long, far right, and Margaret Blair McGraw, the tallest of the four women. Names of the other two women are unknown. The two boys are Jim Blair, the taller one, and Joe Bob Long. The photo was taken from the Lexington side, near the memorial that was built on the Lafayette County side. According to a description in the new book ‘Lexington,’ from Arcadia Publishing’s ‘Images of America’ series, voters in both counties quickly passed bonds to raise the $450,000 each side contributed to build the bridge (See related story below). The bonds were passed in 1922, but the bridge didn’t open until Nov. 5, 1925. (Photo contributed by Jean McGraw Clark, Blue Springs)

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