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Two angels care for discarded dog

Dozer is fed regularly outside the Crossroads convenience store by Debbie Clark, a store clerk, and Orrick funeral director Larry Thompson. The stray has warmed up to them, but still won’t allow them to touch him. (Photo by David Knopf/Richmond News)

Dozer is fed regularly outside the Crossroads convenience store by Debbie Clark, a store clerk, and Orrick funeral director Larry Thompson. The stray has warmed up to them, but still won’t allow them to touch him. (Photo by David Knopf/Richmond News)

Believed to have been mistreated, the non-aggressive stray called Dozer remains shy of people, making a rescue challenging

 By David Knopf/Richmond News

Some may see him as one dog among the millions caught in the same predicament –dumped along a highway to fend for themselves.

But that’s not how Debbie Clark, a clerk at Crossroads convenience store in Orrick or local funeral director Larry Thompson view a black and brown mixed breed who’ll eat food people bring him but won’t let himself be touched.

“People just basically feed him,” said Clark, who’s cared for a dog she calls Dozer for two months. “Everybody that comes in and sees him will get a treat for him.”

The dog isn’t aggressive and has a routine, Clark says, crawling into a culvert to keep cool during the day and coming out just before sundown to eat.

“He won’t let us touch him, but he’ll jump up and come to us and wag his tail,” she said. “I said, ‘This dog can be rehabbed. I know he can.’ I haven’t given up on him.”

Clark said she thinks Dozer was probably beaten before he was dropped near Crossroads. The dog shows signs of wanting to approach people but is very wary.

Clark and Thompson have tried several approaches to begin a rescue process, including placing a tranquilizing allergy medicine in the dog’s food. Nothing has worked so far, even though the Higginsville rescue group Friends of the Friendless says it will take him in and begin rehabilitation by slowly gaining the dog’s trust and socializing him.

• • •

Clark and Thompson welcome suggestions and donations to help purchase food and to hire a professional to attempt to sedate the dog so he can be driven to Higginsville. For information, call either Clark (816-462-2983) or Thompson (816-206-5825).

 

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