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Inch of rain welcome, but it’s no cure for drought

By David Knopf/Richmond News

The inch or so of rain Ray County received Tuesday – followed by light snow the next day – was a welcome reprieve for drought-weary farmers.

Fields parched by 2012’s high temperatures and lack of rain quickly absorbed the precipitation, and ranchers with dry pastures and ponds at low levels welcomed the contribution, however small in the context of a record dry year.

But the rain and snow would need to repeat the performance and continue over the long haul to make a dent in a drought that’s altered how grain and livestock farmers go about their business.

The leading areas of concern were raised Jan. 25 when five Missouri Extension specialists hosted “Dealing with Drought: A Resource Guide for Agricultural Producers,” a day-long program for farmers in Clinton County.

A number of the same topics will be on the agenda Feb. 6, when Ray County Agronomist Wyatt Miller welcomes a panel of specialists at the 2013 Annual Soil and Crops Conference.

An evaporated pond on the south side of Highway 13 near the Missouri River bridge is a victim of a dry year with unusually warm temperatures. (Photo by David Knopf/Richmond News)

An evaporated pond on the south side of Highway 13 near the Missouri River bridge is a victim of a dry year with unusually warm temperatures. (Photo by David Knopf/Richmond News)

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